BUTTHOLE SURFERS - PSYCHIC... POWERLESS... ANOTHER MAN'S SAC (LP)

BUTTHOLE SURFERS - PSYCHIC... POWERLESS... ANOTHER MAN'S SAC (LP)

Regular price
$22.99
Sale price
$22.99
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

*THIS IS A PREORDER.* Will ship / be available for pickup on or around March 22nd, 2024, barring any major manufacturing issues.*

BLACK VINYL LP.

"The early-mid ‘80s had their share of insane combos -- The Birthday Party, Black Flag and Minor Threat had the raw power to melt your mind in seconds. SWANS, Einsturzende Neubauten and Big Black created enough overwhelming sonic pressure their sounds might actually flatten you. And Sonic Youth displayed such a dizzyingly unpredictable mix of art, pop culture and violence you’d sometimes leave their shows drooling. The Buttholes shared elements with all of these groups, but added an insane psychedelic edge and a propensity for bizarre spectacle. A40 years later, Butthole Surfers have announced their first batch of reissues in collaboration with Matador Records certain to raise the roof for a lot of people who thought they had a pretty good handle on the outer realms of the ‘80s indie-rock scene. ‘PCPPEP’ was the first to feature the power of the band’s classic two drummer line-up (King Coffey and Teresa Taylor). The synchronized percussive brutarianism of this pair (falsely rumored to be siblings) provided the perfect base for the unhinged blurt of the guitars and vocals then being shared by Gibby Haynes and Paul Leary. ‘Psychic...Powerless... Another Man’s Sac’ was also wildly advanced over the previous records. Parts of the LP swaddled their punk edge inside so much oink and babble you almost couldn’t discern it, with other segments stretching out into a mutant form of garage blues, and others just swirling out of control. This evolution continued on ‘Rembrandt Pussyhorse,’ mixing rock-based form destruction with experimental, tape-mangling passages of many flavors. Meanwhile, their live shows became legendary examples of excess and derangement, and their music just kept getting louder and stranger and more savage. It was the diametric opposite of the hardcore scene from which it had emerged, which was heading in ever more codified and stylistically conservative directions."